Engine tuning/ bike build


  • @SpookDog
    Ill keep updating man, me as much as anyone wants to see it finished and working, i managed to get it to read my bikes rpms today, tomorrow ill tackle the roller rpm and see if i can figure that out


  • @Arild
    Don’t you really need another roller in front or behind the electric one? To stop the wheel from trying to climb off of the electric roller?
    I think when there’s two the wheel just sits in between them. Especially if you can match the force/friction between them with a pulley or chain??...
    Scratch that, the rollers have to turn in opposite directions. I can’t get my head around how you’d do that..


  • @SpookDog
    Not really, if u look at production dynos its often just one roller, with the bike tied down and with the stop at the front it doesnt move, however ive been thinking and my conclusion is that it probably still wont work, seeing as the roller needs to be heavier, or larger diameter

    This because the engine doesnt have the same resistance on the rollers as when its on ground, this causes the engine on the bike to rev to like 13k and the roller speeda up way too fast for accurate measurements i would think, havent tested that far yet however cause i had other stuff coming up


  • @Arild Keep us posted 😉


  • Would weighting it with a flywheel help?...
    I’m thinking dumbbell weight 😄 ...


  • @SpookDog said in Engine tuning/ bike build:

    Would weighting it with a flywheel help?...
    I’m thinking dumbbell weight 😄 ...

    I know nothing about dyno’s so bare with me here...
    But wouldn’t altering the weight change the amount of resistance/force needed to move the roller in the first place thus altering readings more?


  • @Stevie-Wonder
    Long time no hear, bud!...
    Yeah, but you’d want to try and match it to the weight of the bike and rider. Don’t get me wrong, I’m no expert on anything! My head just tells me that there needs to be some resistance otherwise it would be making revolutions and not much else?
    How the feck you calibrate it I don’t know...


  • Small update, ive not really been in the garage since fall break ended but this is what ive done this weekend

    I was curious if you could change the bushings in the clutch basket, since my engine is clanking alot and making wierd sounds and i somewhat remember the clutcj basket being somwhat loose when i put it in, so since i have another dtr basket laying in my garage, a broken one, i decided to see if it can be opened up and i was thinking if i could maybe cad up some bushings for the clutch in the bike.

    alt text

    This is what it looked like, and it can infact be redone if u have a sloppy basket and these bushings get worn out, the only thing is i think you would have to thread those three holes where there had previously been pins holding it all together.

    I also decided to cad up an attachment to my dremel that i can use to port my barrel, since all 90 degree grinders are so expensive and ive seen other peopel doing similar things i decided to mock it up in cad.
    this is what i came up with, still a rough idea tho

    alt text

    Might not look like anything, but it will be powered by a rubberband or something along those lines, i got this idea from two stroke stuffing on youtube on his video on a homemade 90 degree grinder https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=W6V5Piz_Uz8
    Im scavenging parts from a 90 degree attachment i bought off of ebay that fits onto the dremel but it was too big to fit inside the bore


  • Interesting to see the clutch basket split.

    I was looking at it the other day as it happens and was wondering what it looked like 😛


  • @calum yeah i agree, i wanted to check if it was possible to change worn bushings and it looks like it is, however like i mentioned the real problem is putting it back together, my idea is to thread the holes and use some bolts and the best loctice there is but still id be somewhat worried of it coming loose

    Whenever my engine is being torn out for a rebuild ill probably look into rebuilding the current basket aswell since it was alot more loose than the broken one I split


  • Where are you getting the bushes from?


  • @calum Id either take the ones from the broken basket since they seem pretty good, but im also thinking of designing a them in solidworks so whoever that needs them can just get them 3D printed, i however know nothing about 3d printing and im curious what the best plastic filament would be to use for something like that


  • @arild
    Can you please post a pic of the under side of the cog piece?

    I think that the cog would have to be real sloppy loose to need new bushes...
    Also, I’d just rivet it back together like it was originally. Just use steel rod...


  • @spookdog

    Yeah, ur probably correct, this basket is fine but its the one in my bike currently that is worse, and since this basket was broken anyway i wanted to have a look
    alt text
    alt text

    Also, it would work to rivet it back together, however, for someone to do that at home might be difficult, youd need a hydraulic press and probably a lathe to machine the rivets since theyre conical on one side

    I would just think its easier to get the holes threaded to m6 and use some bolts and alot of loctite, atleast for people without a developed workshop at home, i got no experience with loctite however so idk if theres stuff strong enough to hold the bolts in place

    Posting this from my phone so no clue if the pictures are going up like theyre supposed to


  • @arild
    I’m guessing The clutch on your bike should feel really snatchy when engaging and disengaging the clutch, if it’s worn that bad? If it doesn’t I’d look somewhere else for the noise...

    Any engineering firm near you can make/supply and press rivers for next to nothing (I’m guessing under £20, they rebore a cylinder for about 40!) It’d be less work than threading it and finding a conical bolt to fit. Just google ‘local engineer’ and you’ll find loads of real clever people willing to work for you on any project you can imagine 🙂 they’re an underused resource IMO...

    Cheers for the pics, I’ve always wondered what it looked like inside...


  • @spookdog Engineering firm round me took 16 months to clean my engine and still haven't welded my RS frame yet. Guys are mentall busy!!!

    I reckon you should be able to tap the threads and lock tight without a problem. Get a nice countersunk bolt in there too by the looks of it.


  • There's quite a few guides out there, on doing it on banshee engines, which are very similar to ours. They tap and bolt the two half's together. Nearly every basket I've had in my hands has had excessive play. Problem for us is getting the rubber parts unless someone can 3d print them.


  • @spookdog
    i get u mate, problem is over here in sweden that whole industry of workshops, small garages, people reboring cylinders and all that is growing smaller by the day, i called a local guy to me to check and he took 80 pounds to rebore the cylinder, however that guy also does work for koenigsegg and theyre cylinders so that might impact his idea of a good price idk, there isnt really anywhere to call over here if u dont know the contacts already sadly, idk how it impacts the engine tbh but i would think if those bushings are loose and worn it would make a clanking noise since the cog wouldnt move aswell together with the rest of the basket if u get what i mean.

    @DTR-NSR as i said above im planning on 3d printing a pair if i get spare time for that, i might make a batch and sell them for 5 pounds or something


  • @arild said in Engine tuning/ bike build:

    @DTR-NSR as i said above im planning on 3d printing a pair if i get spare time for that, i might make a batch and sell them for 5 pounds or something

    I'd definitely be interested in a set!


  • @arild said in Engine tuning/ bike build:

    80 pounds to rebore the cylinder

    £80 for a rebore is very expensive, Mick Abbey charges £25 for a
    rebore and hone and postage abroad is only £10 as done a few
    cylinders for overseas customers.